Your DNA Profile is Private? A Florida Judge Just Said Otherwise

DNA policy experts said the development was likely to encourage other agencies to request similar search warrants from 23andMe, which has 10 million users, and Ancestry.com, which has 15 million. If that comes to pass, the Florida judge’s decision will affect not only the users of these sites but <a href=”https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/11/science/science-genetic-genealogy-study.html” data-id=”46″ data-m=”{” i”:46,”p”:42,”n”:”partnerlink”,”y”:24,”o”:4}” target=”_blank” data-hl=”viglink” style=”box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 99, 176); font-family: ” segoe ui bold”, “segoe wp wp”, ui”, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: font-variant-caps: font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: -0.1px; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: widows: word-spacing: -webkit-text-stroke-width: background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);” rel=”noopener noreferrer”>huge swaths of the population, including those who have never taken a DNA test. That’s because this emerging forensic technique makes it possible to identify a DNA profile even through distant family relationships.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/05/business/dna-database-search-warrant.html